National Geographic Kids hits a home run with summer reads kids will LOVE

Ask any teacher what they want kids to do over the summer and most will reply: read. Of course we teachers all want kids to be outside, enjoying the summer weather and swimming and playing, but we also want them reading. Learning to enjoy reading, and reading for the sake of enjoyment, is a pastime that will have lifelong benefits. A person who reads is an informed person who is better able to analyze what is fact and what is fiction.

Continue reading

‘Big Ideas for Little Philosophers’ series shares wonderful thoughts for young readers

The belief that a child is never too young to learn about big ideas like happiness, truth, equality and imagination is exemplified in a series of board books (yes, board books!) written by Duane Armitage and Maureen McQuerry and illustrated by Robin Rosenthal. The series includes “Truth with Socrates,” “Imagination with René Descartes,” “Equality with Simone de Beauvoir,” and “Happiness with Aristotle.”

Each of the books begins with a simple, child-friendly definition of “philosopher” and states in a large white font on a bright background, “A philosopher is a person who loves wisdom. Wisdom means knowing things that help you live better and be happy.”  The next page has an illustration of the philosopher, and the text shares simple information about each one. For example, “Aristotle was a philosopher who liked to think and ask questions about his life. He wondered about the purpose of his life and what made him happy.” Simone de Beauvoir “believed all people were equal.” René Descartes “used his imagination to help him understand the world.” And Socrates “….said wisdom means being truthful and honest.”

Children will understand the simple text that nevertheless carries important meanings and ideas. Parents and teachers will appreciate the chance to have important discussions with young children that might help them think about concepts like truth and happiness — things that children can’t see or touch, but that are just as real as any toy they play with.

The board books are sturdy and suitable for really young children, but because of the content, they are also suitable for older children as well. The illustrator manages to make the art engaging for young readers as there is much to see and discuss on the pages. When René is trying to use his imagination, we can see in his thought bubble a plethora of items from stars and rainbows to a paintbrush and a violin and leaves and fish.

These would be a great gift for a newborn but also for any young child with an inquiring mind (or parents who love teaching their children about worthwhile topics). They would also be a great addition to any preschool or kindergarten classroom. It’s never too early to learn about these truths.

Please note: This review is based on the final board books provided by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, the publisher, for review purposes. 

‘Wreck this Picture Book: How to make a book come to life’ by Keri Smith takes a book on an adventure

“Wreck This Picture Book: How to make a book come to life” by Keri Smith is a different kind of picture book. We just watched the movie, “The Trial of the Chicago 7” and it was fabulous. I was reminded that Abbie Hoffman wrote the book titled, “Steal this Book.” I think he might have liked this book.

Smith explains that books that aren’t read are lonely and bored. They wait for someone to read them and take them on adventures. She encourages children to explore this book, to ruffle its pages and smell the unique book smell it has. Readers will rub the book, touch the pages with fingers, noses, elbows, and perhaps even toes (yuck). They might (horrors!) fold the pages. What they will never do again is take a book for granted.

The illustrations are bold and eye-catching. Bright colors against white space; Smith cleverly uses recycled materials like cardboard, old magazines, fabric, nails, cork, old lids, newspapers and more to create a collage of color. Even the book jacket opens to instruct readers on how they can build their own cork people (It’s assumed that the adults in their life can supply the corks.)

This is a unique and joyful picture book that will delight readers. It encourages kids to be involved, active participants in reading. It’s main point is that a book has no meaning or use unless somebody reads it, so you, the reader, make the book whole.

Please note: This review is based on the final, hardcover book provided by Dial Books for Young Readers, the publisher, for review purposes.

4 pandemic-perfect children’s nonfiction that will educate and entertain

There’s a pandemic going on. In my county, all schools are remote right now. So what do parents do when they need to work and the kids need something to do when their zoom meetings end? Give them a great book to read. Add bonus points if the book is educational.

Here are two nonfiction books for middle grade children that will entertain, educate, shock, and make them laugh. It’s inevitable. After all, the titles of two of the books have the words “poop” and “butt” in them. The other two books are excellent for parents to use, with gross science experiments and exciting sensory bins that will keep children engaged and busy. Take your pick – there’s a book here for any parent.

Continue reading

‘The NOT Bad Animals’ by Sophie Corrigan is the perfect book for an online lesson in critical thinking

not bad animals

It’s stay-at-home time in Illinois with COVID 19 everywhere. We left school on a Thursday afternoon expecting to return on Friday. But after an emergency school board meeting, our superintendent (rightly) decided to close school that night. School as usual was cancelled, and we have not been allowed to go back.

For me, it’s presenting a problem because all of my treasured personal picture books, a collection built up over years of reviewing superb books, are in my classroom. But a few new picture books have arrived in the mail, and one, in particular, is going to make for an excellent lesson with my first and second (and maybe third) grade students. Continue reading