‘Marrying Winterborne’ by Lisa Kleypas: Fabulously different historical romance

marrying

Rating: 4 stars

It’s hard to write a romance with a new twist because so many of the plots have been done over and over again. That’s not to say that they are not beautifully done — over and over — but it’s wonderful to read ahistorical romance with a plot line that is unique, and “Marrying Winterborne” is just that.

In her last romance, “Cold-Hearted Rake,” Kleypas introduced the two main characters and actually began their love story. But no fear if you haven’t read it. You can either run and buy it and read it first, or read “Marrying Winterborne” first and then read about what came before. Kleypas doesn’t rely on background for this story — it stands beautifully on its own.

What happens when two very different people fall in love? Misunderstandings abound, to be sure. But Winterborne, a man who started life a poor Welsh boy and rose to prominence through his business brilliance, has fallen in love with Helen, the daughter of an earl. Not only is she the daughter of an earl, she is delicate and refined. In short — everything that Rhys Winterborne is not. He is large, brash, and decisive. He knows what he wants, but he also has a huge amount of pride. When Helen jilts him at the beginning of the story, his pride threatens to get in the way of his happiness.

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‘I Let You Go’ by Clare Mackintosh: Superb twisted thriller

let you go

Rating: 4 1/2 stars

“I Let You Go” by debut author Clare Mackintosh has been compared to psychological thrillers like “Gone Girl” and “The Girl on the Train.” The author spent twelve years working on criminal investigations and she is married to a police officer. The story stems from a case that she had worked on of a boy killed in a hit-and-run accident.

In this novel, Mackintosh delves into what happens when a tragedy like that occurs. In this story, the narrative is told by different people — the protagonist telling the story in first person. There is also the third person story of Ray and Kate, two Bristol police investigators trying to solve the mystery of who killed the young boy. Then, there is the mysterious narrative told in a strange-but-very-effective narrative which is first person, but unlike the protagonist’s first person narrative, this one is told as if talking to someone in the story — with abundant use of the word “you.”

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Viral photo of dead dogs on floor of shelter has people inflamed

dead dogs

A picture of at least seven dead dogs strewn on the floor has gone viral. The picture was posted on Facebook by an inmate named Chad Winchester who posted it with the comment, “This is what I came across at the dog pound in Modesto. Thoughts?” (Here is one link to the photo on Facebook.”

He also wrote in comments: “And over in the corner behind the table was a few smaller dogs.” and “Well i opened up the door to go in that room to mop the floor (its the ER room). But as you can see they must have just got done putting those down”

The photo is allegedly of the room in the Stanislaus Animal Services Agency where dogs are killed. Many are outraged at the disrespect that the picture seems to show toward the dogs. Others fear that those who relinquished their dogs to be killed might be upset seeing the body of their dog this way.

No one has answered the question about why multiple deceased animals would be left in the same room. Ethical and other standards for killing dogs and cats indicate that there should not be previously killed bodies of animals in the same room in which the killing is taking place, nor should live animals witness the killing of other animals. The shelter needs to address whether they adhere to that ethical practice, which is not indicated by the photo.

The shelter posted on their website:

We have received an overwhelming number of calls and messages for support of Animal Services expressing their concern and disbelief that an inmate in our community thought it was okay to post a picture on Face Book disrespecting deceased dogs and their owners. The picture is disrespectful to the families of these dogs and was posted purely for shock value. Dog owners come to us to humanely euthanize their pets as a service we provide to the community. We do humanely and compassionately euthanize pets that are ill, injured, or unable to find a new home.”

The picture, according to those who work in the Stanislaus shelter, was taken by someone on work release who entered a room that should have been locked. Whether or not he should have taken and posted this picture, it should cause concern about the number of dogs and cats who are killed each and every day in shelters. Not necessarily in “evil” shelters (although there are plenty of shelters that are not as humane as they should be), but in shelters where they simply can’t deal with the vast numbers of dogs and cats abandoned and unwanted by their owners.

Dogs and cats are dumped at shelters, left in rural areas to die, abused, given away to abusive people, and otherwise not cared for. Shelters try to clean up the mess that irresponsible people make. Responsible people spay and neuter their animals. They provide medical care and heartworm preventative for them so that they don’t get sick. But many, many others don’t believe in spending one extra nickel on their animals. “It’s just a dog,” they say.

And the result of that attitude is clearly seen in this picture. Miami Dade Animal Services in Miami, Florida, claims to be a no-kill shelter. Yet in one three-day period this month, almost 100 animals were killed. Imagine not the seven or ten animals in this picture, but 96 cats and dogs piled up — dead.

Does there need to be change in this country to stop the slaughter of dogs and cats? Yes! But until puppy mills are closed and people responsibly spay and neuter their animals, that won’t happen. And ugly scenes like this one will continue to be seen across the country. Those of us who don’t live in this county don’t know what the shelter does or does not do to find homes for all the animals that arrive at the shelter. Those who do live in that county should get involved. Volunteer at the shelter. Take pictures of the dogs and cats and post them on Facebook. Offer to foster for a local rescue. All these activities save lives.

Get involved on a local level. No matter where you live in this county, there are animals in need. Foster a dog or cat. For a week — even that could save a life. Networking dogs is another way to save lives. Remember, on Facebook, hitting the “share” link is what saves lives, not just clicking on “like.”

So is Chad Winchester a hero or a villain? He certainly made sure that those dead dogs are being noticed, and that people are thinking of the dogs being killed in shelters. And that’s a good thing — no matter his intentions.

Tank killed before adopter could get him; MDAS kills dozens of animals in 1 day

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Tank wagged his tail at a volunteer. He kissed her fingers and rolled over for a belly rub. The only thing aggressive about Tank was the way he hugged volunteers (see photo). Yet Tank is the latest casualty at a shelter that labels dogs as “aggressive” and then kills them. Ori, a senior dog, was killed the day before Tank, another dog whose life ended at a shelter that claims it is “no kill.” Yet they consistently label dogs as “aggressive” before they kill them. Why, one might wonder, do they label gentle, friendly dogs as aggressive?

There is a method to the madness. According to “no kill” protocol, shelters are allowed to kill as many “aggressive” or “medical” animals as needed without it affecting their precious “save” rate. So often, shelters will label dogs as aggressive or sick so that they can be killed with the deaths not affecting their numbers.

Several articles have been written aboutMiami Dade Animal Services doing just this. In January, this article, “Miami Dade Animal Services labels dogs “aggressive” and then kills them” was published about this very issue.

Poor Tank was only three years old. He arrived at the shelter with taser barbs on his body. Had someone cruel tased the dog for “fun”? Was he tased by animal control officers? Why was this gentle dog treated so cruelly? Tank was at the shelter for over two months. He was available for adoption, but heartbreakingly, just when rescuers found him an adopter, the shelter killed him.

What happened? After two months — two long months — of having Tank available for adoption, one day someone arrived at the shelter and found that overnight Tank had turned aggressive? The rescuers who try to save the dogs from this shelter would scoff at that idea. Tank had taken up space for too long, and this shelter routinely labels dogs as aggressive so they can be killed without messing up their pretty statistics.

One person posted on Facebook:

“Friendly and loving, this cutie is ready to go home with you!”

Tank’s intake photo doesn’t show his gentle nature and affectionate personality, but his video does! Want your heart broken? Watch this video of Tank kissing the fingers of a visitor. His tail never stops wagging and he rolls over for a tummy rub. A more adorable, lovable dog would be hard to find.

Many tried to get Tank to safety. Life Is Good with Dogs posted Tank on their Facebook page. But the shelter didn’t send out a notice about Tank’s scheduled killing. They didn’t ask volunteers or rescue groups if they were actively networking Tank. They just killed him, along with 33 other dogs and cats. One might wonder how long it takes to kill that many animals. Do they rush through to get it done quickly? Do they have animals waiting in the same room where other animals are being killed to save time? Other shelters have done that.

This shelter, Miami Dade Animal Services, in one 24-hour period this week killed 21 cats and 13 dogs. Among the dogs were Tank and Ori. Ori’s story is told in “Dog adopted at shelter dumped 9 years later; shelter killed him in 4 days.” Unlike Tank, Ori was only given four days at the shelter to find a home. Tank had an adopter who wanted him. Both dogs could have lived, but they were killed by Miami Dade Animal Services, Tank after being (mis)labeled “aggressive” and Ori, whose death was probably labeled as “medically indicated.”

Please share this story. The mayor of Miami is running for reelection. One of his opponents has promised to help the animals of Miami Dade County. They need it!

Dogs are needlessly dying; rescue group needs information to save them

Volunteers need the shelter to provide information about the dogs


Hillsborough County Animal Services appears to have incompetent management. The county shelter has volunteers who work tirelessly every night to post the dogs who are listed on the euthanasia list for the next day. By posting these dogs on their Facebook page, Rescue Me Tampa (RMT), they have saved countless dogs. Watch this video to see the faces of the dogs in danger and hear about how the shelter is denying information that is urgently needed to save the dogs.

However, because the shelter has installed new software, the volunteer group is not getting the information they need to try to save as many dogs’ lives as possible. They have been posting “blind” for over two weeks because they do not have accurate information about the dogs in the most danger. The shelter is completely filled and dogs are dying — and those who work hardest to save the dogs are being stymied by the current shelter management.

The shelter asks for patience, but perhaps the shelter director does not understand that patience is a luxury the dogs — who are being killed daily — do not have. The volunteers send emails to the shelter — urgent emails — and they say the shelter doesn’t respond for days. When Rescue Me Tampa writes a Facebook post about a dog, they say that it’s almost certain that one of the group has personally spent time with that dog (99% of the time). But with the lack of accurate information, they also have been posting dogs when there are pleas from volunteers and staff about their favorite dogs urgently needing rescue. In that case, they get the information either from the volunteers or from the staff who work with the dogs.

The information that is posted on their site is as accurate as they can make it. They post the good and the bad. Some dogs are highly adoptable dogs who are in danger of dying through no fault of their own. Other dogs may be more difficult to place because they are dog selective or senior dogs.

Lately, however, the page has been posting dogs as killed who turn out not to have been killed. Those mistakes occur because of incorrect information from the shelter.

One of us found a dog this week at the shelter who we had cried over the night before; it was very emotional to see that dog still alive. We spent a night saying RIP instead of working to help her find a home. We have always posted how the dog found their way into the shelter, their complete medical information, any notes from owners and finders of strays, play group notes and any other information to help them find the right home. Rescues rely on precise details to help dogs. Now, we have nothing other than their personality.”

The last time this happened (a software change), this group estimates that at least 51 animals were killed, including eight-month-old healthy puppies. Dogs are dying every day — please help!

The group is begging people to help by sending respectful emails to those listed below. Please request that the reports given to Rescue Me Tampa immediately be resumed so that lives are saved.

Email both these people: merrillm@hillsboroughcounty.org andtrebatoskis@hillsboroughcounty.org

Please copy the following Board of County Commissioners on the email:

hagank@hillsboroughcounty.org
becknerk@hillsboroughcounty.org
millerLJ@hillsboroughcounty.org
higginbothama@hillsboroughcounty.org
murmans@hillsboroughcounty.org
cristv@hillsboroughcounty.org
WhiteS@hillsboroughcounty.org

and please copy Rescue Me Tampa at rescuemetampa@yahoo.com. Please remember that the staff at the shelter work hard and care for the animals. It’s not their fault that the management doesn’t value each and every life.

Please note this response from Scott Trebatoski, director of the shelter: Although we have been working on the transition to a new software product we have been providing information on incoming and outgoing dogs on a regular basis to all groups and the public.

When asked for comment, one of the administrators of Rescue Me Tampa stated that while the shelter used to send RMT three reports a day, one in the morning with information about new dogs from the day before, and two reports around 7:00 pm with outcomes from the day (animals killed) and a “Rescue Me Tampa” report with information about all the dogs in the shelter. That information included notes and medical information so that RMT could share that information on Facebook for networking.

Now, RMT is just receiving a report every night on the killed dogs. And apparently, that report has numerous errors. There are some notes on the dogs, but not as complete as previous reports and not as useful. And while the intake and outcome reports are posted on the shelter website, it’s a day late — when it’s sporadically posted.

The group of people who work so hard to save the dogs in Tampa feel that the shelter is trying to make it impossible for them to operate. They said, “They are trying to silence us. We tell the truth about them.”

Dog adopted at shelter dumped 9 years later; shelter killed him in 4 days

This sweet collie mix with a sparkle in his eyes, a wagging tail, and a relaxed tongue seemed darling. His heartless family had adopted him from the shelter as a puppy and abandoned him at the age of nine at the same shelter from which he had been adopted. Did they not want to care for him in his old age once he’d given them the best years of his life? Did they even look back at him and think of his fate — dying alone in a cold, concrete room by uncaring hands?

Ori was abandoned by his heartless family to die at the shelter-slide0
Mayra Eakes
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Please share to help stop other dogs from being killed

Miami Shelter Big, Bullies Black

Volunteers were heartbroken when they arrived to assess Ori merely four days after his arrival, only to find that he had already been killed by the shelter. While owner surrenders can be killed immediately (because there is no “hold” time to look for an owner), this supposedly “no-kill” shelter certainly didn’t waste any time getting rid of an animal they thought unadoptable.

His video shows a long-coated dog suffering in the heat of Miami. The shelter wasted no time in labeling this senior as aggressive so they could kill him quickly. The person who took the video wrote:

Medical noes state he has some sensitivity in spine area, but no where did it say he was aggressive. With this sign slapped across his kennel card and an owner surrender, Ori’s chances of getting out alive are slim to none.”

But never fear — his death won’t show up as a “kill.” They will either say that he was aggressive or killed for medical reasons so that he won’t mess up their precious statistics. Mysteriously, this shelter kills very few adoptable dogs, but many aggressive dogs and dogs in medical need of “humane euthanasia.” They also lose a few dogs. That keeps their “save” rate looking great. And that’s what’s important — the save rate.

For this senior dog, the save rate didn’t help him. He was nine years old and might have lived for several years more. He had people interested in saving him. But the shelter only gave him four days to live. The volunteer also commented on the difference between his intake photo, where Ori seems alert, friendly, and happy, to the video just a few days later after he realized that his family had abandoned him. Ori is depressed and seems to have given up hope.

Then the shelter made sure he had no hope — only death at the end of a needle.

Ori was ID#A1004306. Please take a moment to remember him. He was abandoned to die by his family on May 21 and killed four days later. His owners will probably be able to adopt another puppy from this very shelter, keep that puppy for a few years and then abandon the dog to die when the dog becomes old, inconvenient or sick. Please share Ori’s life and his untimely death. His story was posted on a Miami dog rescue page on Facebook: Miami Shelter Big, Bullies Black & Been Around.

Tank killed before adopter could get him; MDAS kills dozens of animals in 1 day

tank

Tank wagged his tail at a volunteer. He kissed her fingers and rolled over for a belly rub. The only thing aggressive about Tank was the way he hugged volunteers (see photo). Yet Tank is the latest casualty at a shelter that labels dogs as “aggressive” and then kills them. Ori, a senior dog, was killed the day before Tank, another dog whose life ended at a shelter that claims it is “no kill.” Yet they consistently label dogs as “aggressive” before they kill them. Why, one might wonder, do they label gentle, friendly dogs as aggressive?

MDAS kills 34 animals in 24-hour period

Lifeisgoodwithdogs on Facebook

There is a method to the madness. According to “no kill” protocol, shelters are allowed to kill as many “aggressive” or “medical” animals as needed without it affecting their precious “save” rate. So often, shelters will label dogs as aggressive or sick so that they can be killed with the deaths not affecting their numbers.

Several articles have been written about Miami Dade Animal Services doing just this. In January, this article, “Miami Dade Animal Services labels dogs “aggressive” and then kills them” was published about this very issue.

Poor Tank was only three years old. He arrived at the shelter with taser barbs on his body. Had someone cruel tased the dog for “fun”? Was he tased by animal control officers? Why was this gentle dog treated so cruelly? Tank was at the shelter for over two months. He was available for adoption, but heartbreakingly, just when rescuers found him an adopter, the shelter killed him.

What happened? After two months — two long months — of having Tank available for adoption, one day someone arrived at the shelter and found that overnight Tank had turned aggressive? The rescuers who try to save the dogs from this shelter would scoff at that idea. Tank had taken up space for too long, and this shelter routinely labels dogs as aggressive so they can be killed without messing up their pretty statistics.

One person posted on Facebook:

“Friendly and loving, this cutie is ready to go home with you!”

Tank’s intake photo doesn’t show his gentle nature and affectionate personality, but his video does! Want your heart broken? Watch this video of Tank kissing the fingers of a visitor. His tail never stops wagging and he rolls over for a tummy rub. A more adorable, lovable dog would be hard to find.

Many tried to get Tank to safety. Life Is Good with Dogs posted Tank on their Facebook page. But the shelter didn’t send out a notice about Tank’s scheduled killing. They didn’t ask volunteers or rescue groups if they were actively networking Tank. They just killed him, along with 33 other dogs and cats. One might wonder how long it takes to kill that many animals. Do they rush through to get it done quickly? Do they have animals waiting in the same room where other animals are being killed to save time? Other shelters have done that.

This shelter, Miami Dade Animal Services, in one 24-hour period this week killed 21 cats and 13 dogs. Among the dogs were Tank and Ori. Ori’s story is told in “Dog adopted at shelter dumped 9 years later; shelter killed him in 4 days.” Unlike Tank, Ori was only given four days at the shelter to find a home. Tank had an adopter who wanted him. Both dogs could have lived, but they were killed by Miami Dade Animal Services, Tank after being (mis)labeled “aggressive” and Ori, whose death was probably labeled as “medically indicated.”

Please share this story. The mayor of Miami is running for reelection. One of his opponents has promised to help the animals of Miami Dade County. They need it!

Dog adopted at shelter dumped 9 years later; shelter killed him in 4 days

Please share to help stop other dogs from being killed

photo by Miami Shelter Big, Bullies Black

 

This sweet collie mix with a sparkle in his eyes, a wagging tail, and a relaxed tongue seemed darling. His heartless family had adopted him from the shelter as a puppy and abandoned him at the age of nine at the same shelter from which he had been adopted. Did they not want to care for him in his old age once he’d given them the best years of his life? Did they even look back at him and think of his fate — dying alone in a cold, concrete room by uncaring hands?

Volunteers were heartbroken when they arrived to assess Ori merely four days after his arrival, only to find that he had already been killed by the shelter. While owner surrenders can be killed immediately (because there is no “hold” time to look for an owner), this supposedly “no-kill” shelter certainly didn’t waste any time getting rid of an animal they thought unadoptable.

His video shows a long-coated dog suffering in the heat of Miami. The shelter wasted no time in labeling this senior as aggressive so they could kill him quickly. The person who took the video wrote:

Medical noes state he has some sensitivity in spine area, but no where did it say he was aggressive. With this sign slapped across his kennel card and an owner surrender, Ori’s chances of getting out alive are slim to none.”

But never fear — his death won’t show up as a “kill.” They will either say that he was aggressive or killed for medical reasons so that he won’t mess up their precious statistics. Mysteriously, this shelter kills very few adoptable dogs, but many aggressive dogs and dogs in medical need of “humane euthanasia.” They also lose a few dogs. That keeps their “save” rate looking great. And that’s what’s important — the save rate.

For this senior dog, the save rate didn’t help him. He was nine years old and might have lived for several years more. He had people interested in saving him. But the shelter only gave him four days to live. The volunteer also commented on the difference between his intake photo, where Ori seems alert, friendly, and happy, to the video just a few days later after he realized that his family had abandoned him. Ori is depressed and seems to have given up hope.

Then the shelter made sure he had no hope — only death at the end of a needle.

Ori was ID#A1004306. Please take a moment to remember him. He was abandoned to die by his family on May 21 and killed four days later. His owners will probably be able to adopt another puppy from this very shelter, keep that puppy for a few years and then abandon the dog to die when the dog becomes old, inconvenient or sick. Please share Ori’s life and his untimely death. His story was posted on a Miami dog rescue page on Facebook: Miami Shelter Big, Bullies Black & Been Around.

Dog was minutes from being killed because of hidden tick causing paralysis

dogtick.jpg

When Ollie, a ten-year-old sheltie stopped eating and found it difficult to walk, no one could figure out what was wrong with him — even the veterinarians. When it seemed as if the kindest thing to do was put Ollie out of his misery, fate — or luck — intervened.

Before the final act of injecting Ollie with the drugs that would allow him to painlessly die, the vet and a visiting veterinary student, Neena Golden, were petting him and comforting him. Both still struggled to understand “why an otherwise healthy dog was experiencing paralysis.” Neena noticed that there was a tick near Ollie’s ears. Apparently, even though Ollie had been wearing a tick collar, a tick had attached itself to Ollie during a recent camping trip.

Dr. Stone examined the tick and the area and in the press release from the veterinary hospital, wrote:

“The tick was very bloated, and there was lots of fecal material from the tick. It had obviously been there for a while.”

Before the camping trip, Ollie had been the picture of health. And once he began showing symptoms of an illness, his family didn’t wait to start having tests done. But all the blood tests, urinalysis, and X-rays didn’t show any reason for Ollie’s symptoms. They tried medication but it didn’t help. When Ollie couldn’t eat, walk or defecate on his own, the heartbroken family had to make a decision.

Luckily, once the vet students found the tick, the veterinarian remembered a rare condition that can be caused by a tick that he had heard about in vet school.

This rare but very real condition can occur, wrote the clinic: “…when the saliva secreted by the tick gets into the dog’s system over a prolonged period of time. It affects the dog’s neurological system and can cause paralysis. Only certain species of ticks can cause this damage, and removing the tick is completely curative.”

The hospital staff shaved Ollie to make sure there were no more ticks anywhere on his body. Once the family learned that this might be the issue, they took him home. Only 10 hours later, Ollie showed almost miraculous signs of improvement.

The press release has a happy ending. “Today, Ollie is back to normal – lively, active and ready to embark on his next outdoor adventure. Al plans to use a tick collar as well as ingestible tick prevention for their next excursion, per Dr. Stone’s recommendation.”

Please remember that your dogs and cats need to be not just on a heartworm preventative, but also on a flea and tick preventative. It might just save their lives!

‘The Status of All Things’ by Liz Fenton and Lisa Steinke

status

Rating: 4 1/2 stars

“The Status of All Things” is the second book by authors Liz Fenton and Lisa Steinke. Their first book, “Your Perfect Life,” was about who we are and how to recognize the good in our lives and appreciate it.

With this new book, they zero in on the subject of love. What is true love? How do we know we’ve found it? And are some things just fate?

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Could Henry’s life have been saved? Volunteers will never know

henry

Henry was a young, sweet dog who was gentle and friendly. He seemed to get along with other dogs. In short, the kind of dog who would easily find a home. Yet “was” is the correct tense to use regarding sweet Henry because he was killed at the Hillsborough County Pet Resource Center. The volunteer group Rescue Me Tampa will always wonder if they could have saved him — had the shelter just shared the information about Henry with them. They wrote:

“RIP Little Henry !! We are so sorry! We know with a last call you would have gotten a foster, you deserved a rescue of foster plea. YOU were so sweet and perfect! Volunteers loved you. You deserved a chance, at the very least an email. Our hearts are completely broken tonight.”

Until this month, Rescue Me Tampa (RMT) would have been able to get the report with Henry on the “euth” list for the next day. They would have sent out Facebook pleas for a foster home for Henry. He had a upper respiratory infection, and space in the isolation unit is limited. Often, with a 10-day foster, a dog’s life is saved.

But Henry didn’t get that opportunity. Because of a software change, the shelter isn’t providing RMT with the information they need to save lives. In a previous article, “Dogs are needlessly dying; rescue group needs information to save them” this issue was addressed. The shelter communications representative called this writer to address some “inaccuracies” in the story.

However, after asking several pointed questions about shelter operations, this staff member could not give an answer to even one of the questions. She said she would get some answers and send a response. That was a week ago. Nothing has been received.

So, the questions remain. Why is the shelter not doing everything in its power to get these life-saving volunteers (who work each and every night, unpaid, unseen) the information they need? If the software isn’t in place, why isn’t the shelter director himself getting together the kill list and information about each of the dogs on that list and sending it to RMT?

The shelter director, Scott Trebatoski, is very concerned with the “numbers” and the no-kill statistics. But that didn’t help Henry, or dogs like him who are going to fall through the cracks.

Another question is why the shelter is closing off access to the outdoor runs where dogs typically urinate and defecate? They are now closing off that access at 3:00 in the afternoon and not opening the doors again until 6:00 the next morning. No house trained dog can last that long. So dogs who may enter the shelter house trained will be forced to defecate in their living area. Or try to hold it for 15 long hours.

See also “Shelter director on the hot seat.

Please take a moment to remember Henry — the dog who might have been saved, but who didn’t get a chance. He was ID#A1640335. Henry was at Hillsborough County Animal Services. Their phone number is 813-744-5660. Feel free to call and let the director, Scott Trebatoski, know how important it is that Rescue Me Tampa get the information they need to save lives. Be polite. Or read the first article (linked above) and write letters to the county commissioners about this. Please be an advocate for those who can’t speak.

Please note: Shelter director Scott Trebotski commented on this article. He wrote: “Henry was diagnosed with bacterial Pneumonia by the veterinary staff and was unresponsive to medical treatment. The veterinarian felt he was suffering and euthanized the dog for medical reasons. This dog would not have been treated any differently under the old reports or the new ones – this was a medical decision.”

Also note a post on Facebook about Trebotski’s post: “Henry was seen by a shelter vet on Monday. He was diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia. The director responded to the article stating that Henry was euthanized because he was not responding to treatment! Seen on Monday. Euthanized on Monday before 4. How did he have time to respond to treatment??? I was called by shelter representative to let me know Henry was euthanized. Why was I called? I had expressed interest in fostering Henry.”

Please also note that when a dog is killed because of medical reasons (or aggression), that death does not count as a dog killed under “no kill” statistics. So theoretically, a shelter could kill 50% of its dogs for medical reasons and still claim a 90% save rate — not suggesting that this is what Hillsborough County is doing, just a comment.

(Please note: This is a reprint from an article previously published on Examiner.com)

Shelter director on the hot seat after lies exposed

georgie

Local rescuers have been saying that the policies and procedures at the Hillsborough County Pet Resource Center in Tampa, Florida, are inhumane. Now, Steve Andrews of NewsChannel 8 has exposed some more of the shelter’s sordid story.

In his recent investigation, titled “Local shelter adopts pets to violent offenders,” Andrews exposes the fact that the shelter will adopt dogs to anyone — including people who just got out of jail. Violent offenders, felons, all are allowed to adopt as many dogs as they want. The list of those enjoined from owning animals is rarely up-to-date. While adopting out as many animals as possible — and to anyone — may make shelter numbers look good, this is hardly good for the animals. (See also: “Convicted dog fighters can adopt dogs from county shelter with failed policies.”)

The local rescuers have complained that Trebatoski’s only goal is to make the numbers look good. And they say he does it any way he can. They claim that people who find a stray dog have been told to let them go on the streets. By reducing intake and keeping the numbers artificially low, the shelter can tweak the numbers to make their “no-kill” statistics look better. Another Florida shelter, the Miami Dade Animal Services, has been accused of doing the same thing.

But Steve Andrews found out more about the less-than-ethical practices of the county shelter. In another piece of excellent investigative reporting, “Hillsborough Pet Resources director kills roosters, allegedly violates county policy,” Andrews reports that Trebatoski allegedly killed roosters using a method that was against the shelter policy. The former animal control director of Pet Services, Pam Perry, told Andrews that Trebatoski violated shelter protocol during his first week on the job. Instead of tranquilizing the roosters before injecting them with the substance that kills them, he injected it directly into a vein at the back of the roosters’ neck.

In the news clip, Trebatoski denies that he knew about that policy when he did that. Perry states unequivocally that she told him before he did it. Recently, an animal control officer was demoted for doing the same thing. Now, Pet Services is saying that the animal control officer was not demoted for the act, but rather for not following his supervisor’s direction.

Dogs are needlessly dying; rescue group needs information to save them” shares the information that the shelter is not providing the important information to the volunteer group Rescue Me Tampa to enable them to save the lives of the dogs at the shelter. After this article was posted on Examiner.com, the shelter’s Senior Media Relations Specialist, Communications and Digital Media, Kara Walker contacted this writer. She wanted to share “clarifications and corrections” to that article. During the course of our conversation, she was unable to answer any of the questions that were raised. She stated that she would get the answers and share them. She has not done so yet.

On the other hand, a recent piece in the Tampa Bay Times called “Kill rate in Hillsborough animal shelters down substantially, officials say,” is hardly an investigative piece. In fact, its picture, according to a local animal activist, is several years old. She posted on Facebook, “Put your waders on. The first problem is Scott never goes in the kennels. This is the same pic that was used a few years ago. This was a PR piece because the truth is coming out.” What Tampa Bay Times published appears to be a public relations ploy for Scott Trebatoski. But it won’t change the facts.